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Category Archives: And now… for something different.

Music is food for the soul.  Computer Animation is animation designed and implemented by humans…. using computers.  It’s very tedious and time consuming to build a 3D model, give it “skin” that makes the model look real, and then move the individual pieces of the model – one frame at a time – to do what you desire. Once this is completed, THEN you can direct the computer to move the point of view, the virtual camera, around your intricate model.  This is how Pixar, Dream Works, and other animation houses create the wonders we’ve come to know and enjoy.

This 4+ minutes is a wonderful marriage of art and technology.  Animusic has a set of DVD’s that can be found on YouTube, if you want to see and hear more.  – Robert

Thanks to Bill B. for passing this along.

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The Rijksmuseum in Holland wanted to bring art to the people and hopefully, they would come see more.  They took one Rembrandt painting from 1642, Night Watch, and did the following in a busy mall.

Enjoy.

Thanks to Susie B. for passing this link along to us.

 

Atlantic spotted dolphin call

This is an image of sounds made by an Atlantic spotted dolphin, recorded near the Azores.

It both clicks and whistles. The clicks are represented by the straight lines radiating outwards. The sketchy black lines represent whistles, although these are lower in volume, so they could be from other dolphins.


Image: Science Photo Library/AguaSonic Acoustics

The songs of whales and dolphins can be beautiful to the ear. Now acoustics engineer Mark Fischer has created a way to make them visually pleasing too. What’s more, his technique captures more information about the sound than traditional ways of visualising whalesong.

Click Here to see and hear all ten images.



The Boston Globe offers “The Big Picture” in their online version of Boston.com – Here’s an article I found back in November of 2009. Truly excellent and worth a few moments of your time, these pictures will change the way you think of Mars. You will be surprised. -Robert
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Since 2006, NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has been orbiting Mars, currently circling approximately 300 km (187 mi) above the Martian surface. On board the MRO is HiRISE, the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera, which has been photographing the planet for several years now at resolutions as fine as mere inches per pixel. Collected here is a group of images from HiRISE over the past few years, in either false color or grayscale, showing intricate details of landscapes both familiar and alien, from the surface of our neighboring planet, Mars. I invite you to take your time looking through these, imagining the settings – very cold, dry and distant, yet real. (35 photos total)

Click here to see the pictures.